@rohitkj
9 months ago

Is China the oldest living civilization?

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This is a claim I sometimes hear, and I question on what basis it is made. For I can think of another civilization, just as old if not older than China, which is BETTER preserved, especially after Mao's cultural revolution.

That is India. India is still an incredibly traditional place, where old age customs permeate everyday life. The Indus valley civilization is probably as old as Mesopotamia, and older than the Huang He. Sanskrit and Pali derived languages are still spoken, as well as Tamil, one of the world's oldest languages. Tamil has certainly changed a lot less in 2000 years than Mandarin Chinese. India also has a lot more preserved historical monuments (the Sanchi Stupa dates from 300 BC, China's oldest temple is only from 500 AD). 

One could also make the same argument for Greece, Egypt, Rome or even the Hebrews.etc. I don't think China is all that unique, although it's still a fascinating culture.
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I believe that the Incas Civilization was first lived as far as i know. The history books says they were living between 1438 A.D – 1532 A.D.
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Depends on the definition of civilization but i would have to agree that China is the oldest living civilization, still using the same language and dialect from something like 5000 years ago so it'd be hard to find another older than that.
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I have learned that the Aztecs is the first living civilization on earth. They lived todays Mexico soils.
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With thousands of years of continuous history,  China  is one of the  world's oldest civilizations , and is regarded as one of the cradles of  civilization .
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Yes i believe so.
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I think if we look at the migration of humans across the continents,
it will illustrate the real history!
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Mesopotamian, i learn it in school.. hehee
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With thousands of years of continuous history,  China  is one of the  world's oldest civilizations , and is regarded as one of the cradles of  civilization . The Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) supplanted the Shang, and introduced the concept of the Mandate of Heaven to justify their rule.
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